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Kubernetes gets fully integrated with Visual Studio

There is a good news in store for .NET developers who want to build scalable microservice applications and make them easy to deploy. Kubernetes tools have been made available in both Visual Studio and Visual Studio Code.

Kubernetes was originally developed by engineers from Google, where it was initially referred to as "project Borg". It is an open-source software and was intended to enable a rapid deployment of containerised (i.e. isolated) microservice applications that can be easily scaled to cope with any volume of usage.

Once the tools are installed, a project of a type "Container Application for Kubernetes" can be created in the IDE. Once this is selected as the template for a new project, Visual Studio will automatically create Dockerfile and Helm chart. These two steps are what makes this new project template so useful. Although it was possible to build a Kubernetes application in Visual Studio even before these tools were made available, these two steps used to be notoriously difficult to do.

Another useful feature of the tools is that they are fully integrated with Azure Dev Spaces. This allows for an easy publishing to Azure Kubernetes Services. However, it is also possible to deploy the apps to any other Kubernetes clusters.

Kubernetes in itself is a tool for container orchestration. The process of isolating individual microservices into containers is done by its sister tool, Docker. This is why Dockerfile, which contains step-by-step instructions on how the containers should be built, is included in the project template.

Containers work by having a bare-bone operating system inside of them with only those software components installed that are strictly required to run the application. There are various ways containers can communicate with the outside world and each other. However, only those communication channels (e.g. ports) are open that are strictly necessary. Also, if any container requires access to the drivers on the device it is running on (e.g. for media playback), those drivers can be mounted onto the container.



For more information, follow this link:

https://goo.gl/rZuqkE


Published by

Posted on 15 Jun 2018




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