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US appeals court upheld net neutrality laws

The landmark net neutrality laws, recently introduced by president's Obama administration, have been upheld by the US court of appeal. This came after a group of internet service providers (ISP's) have challenged the rulings.

The rules prohibit infrastructure providers from selling so called "internet fast lanes" to the companies that provide data-intensive services, such as Netflix. The rules also ban the companies from slowing down or blocking non-premium data traffic at the expense of faster premium services.

This is arguably a good news to the consumers, as there is now a guarantee in place that those customers who don't use premium subscription services will not have the quality of their web access diminished. However, ISP's have argued that ability to charge more for the use of dedicated premium infrastructure is essential to fund the internet that is fit to meet ever-increasing future demand.

However, apart from the organisations who have vested interest in not having these laws in place, it is mostly libertarian groups and not the consumer champions who argue against the net neutrality. Libertarian groups with no direct vested interest tend to use a purely ideological argument of having fewer government regulations rather than hard facts about how lack of these laws would benefit the web users.

Whether this court ruling is a good or bad thing overall, it is unlikely to be the end of the matter. ISP's have promised to continue fighting the decisions and sue the US government over it.



For more information, follow this link:

http://uk.reuters.com/article/us-usa-internet-idUKKCN0Z01RR


Published by

Posted on 14 Jun 2016




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